Blog Focus on Health and Fitness

Top Tips for Preventing Foot and Ankle Injuries During Exercise

Foot and ankle injuries are incredibly common among athletes. In sports like basketball, they’re the number one injury year in and year out. You don’t have to be a competitive athlete to be sidelined by foot and ankle injuries though.

Even individuals who hit the gym, jog on a track or trail or just do calisthenics at home are at risk of injuries that can be painful and debilitating. While you may recover in time depending on the severity of the injury, you don’t have to let your feet run the show.

Keep reading to learn more about preventing ankle and foot injuries that can occur during sports and exercise. You’ll also learn about what to do if you do end with an injury. After all, even competitive athletes with the best trainers and exercise routines in the world get hurt from time to time.

Stop Your Activity

When you feel pain or like you might have tweaked your foot or ankle, the most important first step is to simply stop what you’re doing. It doesn’t matter if you’re mid-game or far away from home on a jog. Take your time to stop, sit down and evaluate what you may have done to your foot or ankle.

If the injury doesn’t feel bad, you may be able to resume your activity. If any pain lingers after a few minutes of rest it’s best to stop altogether – at least for a few days.

Call a Doctor

Injuries to the foot and ankle can be problematic because they don’t always completely heal themselves. Even severe sprains can linger for years to come, leaving your tendons and the area in general weak. That means you could be susceptible to more injuries – more serious injuries, too – in the future.

When you have an injury, contact an Orlando foot and ankle clinic right away. This is especially important if sports or exercise are part of your regular routine.

Rest, Rest and Rest Some More

Seeing your doctor is important, but if an injury isn’t serious, rest is often the best medicine. Ice and heat therapy are ideal, and for sprains, elevation is a key. Follow the RICE formula – rest, ice, compression and elevation – to get back to your normal activities as soon as possible.

Don’t rush working out if you still feel pain. Even mild to moderate injuries can take months to heal.